Update on things happening in Rotary and indigenous communities, including current events – Rotary luncheons with guest speakers, open community and cultural gatherings, etc.

 

 

Canada shifts policy in effort to narrow Indigenous education fnding gap

The Canadian government is changing how it allocates nearly $2B in annual funding for First Nations education in an effort to close the gap between on-reserve students and those enrolled in provincial school systems, reports CBC. While provincial governments manage education off-reserve, the federal government funds on-reserve education. Indigenous Services Minister Seamus O'Regan said this week that the new model was developed after an extensive engagement process involving several organizations, including the Assembly of First Natoins, and that one of its core goals is to provide predictable year-over-year funding in line with provincial per-student amounts. Under the new approach, First Nations schools will also receive $1.5K per student every year towards language and cultural programs, while schools will offer full kindergarten for on-reserve kids aged four and five. The funding will be within the jurisdiction and control of chiefs and band councils.

All AB schools to receive new Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada

Every secondary school in Alberta will receive a copy of a new Canadian Georgraphic Indigenous Peoples Atlas of Canada. CBC reports that the resource is being touted as a comprehensive education tool written from the perspective of Indigenous Canadians. Published last year, the atlas is separated into four books, each covering a single broad topic: Truth and Reconciliation, First Nations, Inuit and Metis. "I grew up in Fort Chipewyan...and I didn't learn much about (my history)," said Marlene Poitras. Alberta regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations. ".It was only when I went to post-secondary and into nursing that I started learning (more). That was very important for me to understand. In school, I didn't get that information." The province is distributing 1,600 of the atlas sets, with a free online version available for home-school students and the general public. Charlene Bearhead, who served as the education adviser on the project, says the Royal Canadian Geographical Society heard from more than 200 Indigenous sources to create the books.

 Humber supports reconciliation with cultural land markers

Indigenous gathering places and cultural markers are part of a new genre of architecture in Canada, writes Alex Bozikovic, highlighting a trio of projects at Humber College. "We are in a state of cultural reclamation, rediscovering culture, rediscovering language and art," said Winnipeg-based Anishinaabe architecht Ryan Gorrie, who has worked on the Humber project. Bozikovic notes that the Humber projects reflect an effort by the institution to pursue recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which include sustained awareness of Indigenous land claims. "As Indigenous peoples, we've been taught that our language is written on the land," said Shelley Charles, Humber's dean of Indigenous Education and Engagement, adding that the college's set of Indigenous Cultural Markers "is a contemporary response to that, really creating a land acknowledgement in physical form."

McMaster researchers collaborate with Six Nations knowledge holders

Global Water Futures, a seven-year research program out of the University of Sask, is funding a collaboration between McMaster University researchers and traditional knowledge holders on Six Nations of the Grand River. A release states that the collaboration will focus on water-related issues of training, wellness and resilience, and governance. "We want to develop an enduring legacy of Indigenous knowledge harmonization with western science through the co-creation of sustainable water management pathways for the community," said Dawn Martin-Hill, the Project Lead and Paul R MacPherson Chair in Indigenous Studies at McMaster.

Level launches education, mentorship program in Thunder Bay to change lives through law

A new education and mentorship program launched by Canadian charity Level in Thunder Bay will enable elementary school students between the ages of 11 and 14 to learn more about law and the justice system. The program will see grade six and seven students from Kingsway Park Public School take part in the Indigenous Youth Outreach Program. A volunteer - a student from Lakehead University Faculty of Law - will run a variety of workshops on the Canadian criminal justice system. Since the Canadian criminal justice system is a colonial system, explained Level's Director of Programs Lisa Del Col, the students will also take part in Indigenous legal traditions and teachings. "We do a mock sentencing circle, we do smudging and we incorporate the eagle feather into the curriculum as well," said Del Col. Volunteers will need to approach the program with the mindset of being an ally, she explained, "because they're going to learn just as much from the youth, as the youth are going to learn from them."

 

 

 

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Peterborough teacher draws inspiration from Gord Downie's Secret Path to help create lessons for students

Mitch Champagne worked with Trent University students to develop curriculum based on Chanie Wenjack's story in Secret Path

By  Lance AndersonPeterborough This Week

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

Educator Mitch Champagne teaches a lesson around Gord Downie's Secret Path to his Grade 6/7 students at Immaculate Conception Catholic Elementary School in Peterborough. Champagne was instrumental in the development of the lesson plans based on Downie's songs about Chanie Wenjack. - Lance Anderson/Metroland

PETERBOROUGH — Gord Downie’s voice echoed through the speakers inside Mitch Champagne’s classroom on Tuesday morning (Oct. 31).

The Grade 6/7 Immaculate Conception students sat motionless as the haunting melodies of Seven Matches from Downie’s Secret Path played. The song was accompanied by the animated illustrations of Jeff Lemire moving across the smart board at the front of the class.

The song is one of 10 Downie wrote about Chanie Wenjack’s journey to escape a residential school in Kenora in 1966. The 12-year-old boy died on the train tracks while trying to walk home to the family he was taken from 650 kilometres away.

 

 “He had seven matches and during the whole song he’s talking about keeping them dry,” said Champagne to the class after the song finished. “Those matches probably brought him hope so he could get home and see his family again. How important would that one match be for him?”

Champagne then tasked his students to come up with one word to describe the feeling Chanie may have felt when there was only one match left.

Although some responses varied, most of the kids in the classroom said “scared.”

Read more...

Transform : let life be born and born again

Join us in supporting a nation-to-nation art exhibition

 

First Nations and Canadian painters

March 26 - April 4 2019

Arta Gallery, Distillery District Toronto

be transformed, together

We live in Ontario as a result of the historical treaties and agreements made with the original Nations of this land.

Living in Toronto, we continue to build coalitions and partnerships in our personal and professional work, through businesses, languages, arts, and cultures.

In this show, we come together to represent ourselves as individuals - but connected by a universal human theme.

That theme is transformation.

a salient national priority

Canada is committed to Reconciliation

We are in a new era of improved and renewed relationships, to redress the past

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action urges reconciliation

across all sectors, including public dialogue, the arts, and business partnerships.

giving back

In this spirit of partnerships, a percentage of our sponsorship proceeds will be donated to Rotary HIP – Honouring Indigenous Peoples, a Rotary sanctioned registered charity.

HIP was created by Rotarians from across Canada in partnership and consultation with Indigenous people. Their board is 50% Rotarians and 50% Indigenous partners.

HIP supports community and educational efforts, and encourages Canadians to be aware of indigenous perspectives and priorities.

For more information: www.rotaryhip.com

 

Join us as a sponsor!

Creative marketing on all our materials

Expanding your database

Aligning with national mandates

We’ve Got Options

exposure and affiliation:

Located in the booming Waterfront Community

Toronto Tourists spend over $7 billion

Distillery is a tourist hotspot, designated as a National Historic Site of Canada

Inspired by SoHo in New York City

Local population of ~3,000

Over 100 other local tenants

 

Standing Banner - 7 feet

Exhibition & Artists

 

Thank you to our sponsors

$1000 YOUR LOGO             $2,000 YOUR LOGO

$1,000 YOUR LOGO

 

$500      $500    $500        $500

 

Partnership Testimonials

[We] came away with Evelisa’s art and her event inspired, strong, and excited to go out into the world and make a difference. -

Sandie Green, Senior Vice President, Head of Global Corporate Events & Sales Planning, IMAX Corporation

 

We are excited to hear from you!

Questions/comments/discussion:  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

ig: @evelisanatasha

 

 

Art installation seeks to reconcile through the creative process

Public screening and discussion called Envisioning a Future Toward Reconciliation at the Simcoe Street Theatre on Jan. 30
 by: Jessica Owen
2019-01-14 ArtExhibit JO-001
Mayor Brian Saunderson and Coun. Kathy Jeffery take in the new art exhibit that will adorn the walls of council chambers until March 8, called Call to Action #83. Jessica Owen/CollingwoodToday

The Town of Collingwood unveiled a new reconciliation art project in council chambers on Monday night.

The project is titled Call to Action #83 after the Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission Action #83, which calls upon Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists to undertake collaborative projects and produce works that contribute to the reconciliation process. The project is a collaboration between the Town of Collingwood and the Wawasayguming Arts and Culture Board, and will be on display until March 8.

 

Project Curator Mary Louise Meiers brought together eight Indigenous artists and eight non-Indigenous artists (including local artist Peter Adams) in a quest for truth and reconciliation through sharing, learning, and collaboration.

“Artists chose the order in which to make their artwork, alternating non-indigenous with indigenous,” explained Meiers in a video shown to council. “The first artist who was non-Indigenous, had two weeks to create his piece and then handed it to the first Indigenous artist and with it, shared his creative process. The next artist responded to the piece and in two weeks brought her artwork to the third artist, telling about her process. This continued with each artist being inspired by the previous artist in the quest for a shared vision.”

The result is a linked series of artworks that reflect past experiences while envisioning a future toward reconciliation.

 

The public is invited to view the panels during council and committee meetings, or Thursdays in January and February between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m., or by contacting This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

The public is also invited to a presentation and discussion called Envisioning a Future Toward Reconciliation, at which Meiers will talk about the project along with some of the artists and presiding elders. The presentation will be followed by a screening of Gathering Circle and open discussion and will be held on Jan. 30, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Simcoe Street Theatre. The event is free to attend, but guests are asked to reserve seats.

For more information or to reserve seating, click here.]

 

 

 

 

Story of Collingwood's Awen Gathering Circle inspires documentary

The documentary will premier at the town's Envisioning a Future toward Reconciliation event on Jan. 30.
 by: Erika Engel
GATHERING CIRCLE StillA
The title screen from a documentary produced by Mountain Goat Film Company and the Town of Collingwood on the Awen Gathering Circle, which will premier on Jan. 30.

What began as a short how-it’s-made video on the construction of Collingwood’s Awen Gathering Circle, became a documentary about collaboration along the path to reconciliation.

Tom Strnad, one of the filmmakers on the project said the film became more than a behind-the-scenes look at the design and construction of a structure as soon as he began interviews with those involved. Initially, the town wanted a short video showing how the gathering circle was made. As the filmmakers dove into how it was made, both Strnad and the town began to see the story went deeper than laser-cut steel and cleaning up an old landfill.

The Gathering Circle was created with the direct involvement of indigenous architects, and the idea was inspired by a concept Dr. Duke Redbird came up with – to pair seven Ojibwe grandfather teachings with the seven layers of a food forest.

Tom and Tracy Strnad of Mountain Goat Film Company Inc. co-produced the short film, called Gathering Circle, with the Town of Collingwood. 

“The amount of Indigenous spaces designed by Indigenous architects is really limited,” said Strnad. “So that’s really unique.”

The ten-minute film includes interviews with Cal Brook of Brook McIlroy and Ryan Gorrie, one of the Indigenous architects on the design team.

“The story behind this is perhaps more important than the thing itself,” said Gorrie in the film.

For Strnad, Gorrie’s observation rang true. 

“Seeing it come from basically a pile of what used to be a landfill there … Witnessing the opening ceremonies and learning the stories, the spiritual journey of it, and the journey the film took as well, it really comes together in its own way,” said Strnad. “There’s something special [about the gathering circle]. I think it really brings everyone together. I think it’s a really important step in the truth and reconciliation process.”

In fact, the film is part of the agenda for a town event called Envisioning a Future toward Reconciliation on Jan. 30. The presentation and discussion, which takes place from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Simcoe Street Theatre will include a screening of the documentary, a presentation by Mary Louise Meiers on the Call to Action #83, a reconciliation art project that has combined indigenous and non-indigenous artists brought together to reflect past experiences and envision a future toward reconciliation through their artwork.

Some of the artwork from this project is currently on display at town hall.

Meiers’ presentation will include some of the artists and presiding elders. The evening will conclude with an open discussion.

Tickets to the event are free, but the town is asking guests to reserve a spot online here, or by emailing the Arts and Culture department here. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Strnad said he is currently working with the town to get the film into various film festivals around the world.